Remembering Bishop Geoffrey Rowell

Posted on the 30th May 2018 in the category Events



This day conference is open to all - but especially to all who knew and appreciated Bishop Geoffrey's ministry and teaching.

 

Bishop Jonathan (who was Bishop Geoffrey's chaplain and research assistant before moving to Lambeth Palace) will preside at the Sung High Mass of Requiem before leaving for parish visits in Newton Abbot and Torbay.


Remembering Geoffrey Rowell



Youth Pilgrimage Taster Day

Posted on the 1st Apr 2018 in the category Events



Please find below a poster and application form for a taster day for the Walsingham Youth Pilgrimage.

 

The taster day will be on Saturday 28 April 2018 (closing date for applications 23 April) at Worksop Priory.

 

The 2018 Youth Pilgrimage takes place between 30th July and 3rd August.  Further information from www.walsinghamanglican.org.uk/the-shrine/the-youth-pilgrimage/


Walsingham Youth Pilgrimage Taster Day



Chrism Masses 2018

Posted on the 13th Feb 2018 in the category Events



As we leave Candlemas behind, I want to send you all - all priests and deacons affiliated to The Society and others in our parishes - my prayers that Lent will once more be a blessing, a real springtime in our priestly discipleship. During it let us all pray for one another, and for our witness in the Church of England, for a new intensity, focus, and dedication.

 

We shall next meet in large numbers during Holy Week, and I hope that you look forward to the Chrism Masses as much as I do. It is my hope that both clergy and laity will gather in greater numbers this year.

 

1          Venues for 2018

 

As has become our settled pattern, we will celebrate regionally.

 

  • ·       At St Mary’s Church, Bathwick (Darlington Street, Bath, BA2 4EB), on Monday in Holy Week, 26 March, at 2 pm

 

  • ·       At Exeter Cathedral, on Tuesday in Holy Week, 27 March, at 11.30 am

 

  • ·       At Lichfield Cathedral, on Wednesday in Holy Week, 28 March, at 11.30am

 

Included with this letter are two or three posters for the church(es) where you serve.  Please place them prominently, and promote the event best suited to your parish in parish literature.

 

2          Clergy

 

I trust that attending the Chrism Mass is a personal ministerial priority, and encourage all other priests and deacons associated with your parish or community to do so too.

 

It is, of course, customary for priests to concelebrate the Chrism Mass with the Bishop, and therefore - to help all concerned with preparations - I enclose a reply form is downloadable from this website.  Please fill it in and return to my office - as soon as possible, but by Monday 19 March at the latest.

 

Please would you discuss arrangements with all other clergy in the parish, and ensure that names are either on one or on separate reply cards, or they write direct to me on office@ebbsfleet.org.uk. Please feel free to duplicate this letter for their information.

 

This will help us here in the office, and the local priests liaising with cathedral staff, to ensure that enough vestments, service papers, sets of oils etc are provided.

 

Two further points:

a)     if, for some reason, you cannot be present, I would be grateful if you would write to me personally and say so; and

b)     if any of you knows of a sick or elderly priest who cannot be present, please would you let me know.

 

3          Laity

 

I also hope we can all extend a particular encouragement to the laity to join us too. I shall send by email a note to be added to parish newsletters and the like to help, but your encouragement will I’m sure be crucial. It helps of course to know approximate numbers of laity - again by Monday 19 March please to office@ebbsfleet.org.uk.

 

Readers are welcome to robe, and we shall reserve places for them at the front of the congregational seating – but we need to know their names too.

 

4          On the day

 

Clergy should only need to bring an alb and (as belt and braces) a white stole.

 

In all three venues all oils will be provided in plastic bottles at the end of the Mass, but you are free to bring your own containers should you wish.

 

At St Mary’s Bathwick (Monday 26 March) you will need to be in the Church Hall on the south side of the church, off the cloister, robed and ready by 1.30 pm.

 

At Exeter Cathedral (Tuesday 27 March), you will need to be in the Lady Chapel (at the far east of the church), robed and ready by 11.00 am.

 

At Lichfield Cathedral (Wednesday 28 March) you will need to be in the Chapter House, robed and ready by 11.00 am.

 

5          Oils

 

In each venue, 2 litres of each oil are blessed.

 

Last year some parishes took more than one set, so that not all could take a set away.  On the day one set of oils per church should be collected by you or a lay member of your congregation.  Further supplies may always be requested from my office where remaining stocks are kept.

 

With prayers and every blessing

 

+ Jonathan Ebbsfleet

  


Chrism Mass Reply slip (pdf)



Guild of All Souls Day Conference

Posted on the 16th Jan 2018 in the category Events


The Guild of All Souls are hosting a day conference at the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.  The theme of the day is 'Pastoral Care after Trauma and Sudden Death'.

 

Date: Thursday 21 June, 10.45 - 15.00;

Cost: £15 including a 2 course lunch and coffee on arrival

 

To request a place, please contact Maureen Howard - mihoward@btinternet.com or 01328 820636


Guild of All Souls Day Conference



The Bishop of Ebbsfleet's 2016 Chrism Homily

Posted on the 25th Mar 2016 in the category Events



The Bishop of Ebbsfleet’s Chrism Sermon 2016

(Exeter, Bristol, Lichfield Cathedrals)

 

In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.

 

Why, I wonder, do we celebrate Pentecost in the middle of Holy Week? For that is what this service is about: Pentecost. It’s one of those celebrations that echoes a great feast celebrated at some other time of the year. Holy Cross Day gives us a second look at Good Friday. Corpus Christi revisits Maundy Thursday in the light of Easter. We relive the Transfiguration as part of our Lenten fast. And we’re doing that sort of thing now: this is Pentecost in mid-Holy Week. These celebrations offer us the possibility of going beyond the narrative of an event; they invite us to enter more fully into the mystery of God’s work in us.

 

Pentecost in mid-Holy Week: how so? Our first clue is in the name of today’s Mass, and our second will be in the gospel reading we’ve just heard.

 

Χρίσμα is an ancient word meaning ‘anointing’, from which we have our word Χριστός, Christ, ‘the anointed one’. The name Jesus Christ means literally ‘Jesus Anointed One’: he is the Christ (the Anointed) of the Lord God. It is hardly surprising then that already, in the first generations after the apostles, we find that being daubed with oil is becoming the culminating sign of baptism, when, rising from the waters of the font, a person is anointed with the oil, and becomes a Christian, becomes literally ‘another Christ’. And today’s service is, very practically, a preparation of holy anointing oils for baptisms in a few days’ time on Easter Eve and then in the weeks and months that follow it.

 

But this sign very quickly points us much further. St Irenæus says, ‘When we use the name ‘Christ’, we infer the One who is the anointer, the One who is anointed, and the anointing itself. That is, the Father who anoints; the Son who is anointed; and the Holy Spirit who is himself the anointing.’ (con. Haer., iii.18.3) ‘Jesus Christ’ is Jesus ‘Anointed-with-the-Holy-Spirit’.

 

Our second (and bigger) clue that this is Pentecost in mid-Holy Week is this morning’s Gospel. Right through the opening chapters of Luke’s gospel, the activityof the Holy Spirit is unavoidable. The Spirit comes upon Mary to bring about the birth of Jesus. The Spirit fills Elizabeth who recognizes Mary mother of the Lord. The Spirit fixes on Jesus at his baptism, drives him into the desert to be tempted, and accompanies him in power as he begins his ministry (Lk 4.14). So it can be no surprise to us that when Jesus arrives in Nazareth and stands up in the synagogue he quotes words from Isaiah, ‘The Lord’s spirit is on meanointed me … to preach good news to the poor’ (Lk 4.18). A small synagogue, in a nowhere town, tucked away in the folds of the hills above the great trade route toward the sea, but the atmosphere when he began to preach was, we’re told, electric. Jesus was making an amazing claim. At that time Isaiah’s words were considered to be an as yet unfulfilled prophecy of unprecedented blessings in a ‘year of the Lord’s favour’, which an anointed prophet would bring about. ‘Today’, says Jesus in his homily, ‘this scripture has been fulfilled – in your hearing’. I Am He.

 

This mission of Christ continues over centuries and continents. ‘It is a mission, a movement, that starts with the Father and goes forth, in the power of the Spirit, ‘to bring the good news to the poor’ (Pope Benedict xvi, 11 Oct 2012) The Church—full of baptized and anointed Christians—is the instrument of this work because we are united to him as a body is united to its head. ‘As the Father sent me, even so I send you’ (Jn 20.21), says the Risen Jesus to his disciples, and breathing upon them, adds, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit’ (22). So when we consecrate the Chrism oil—which is our main task this morning—we are preparing the anointing oil which will be the outward sign of that inward Gift: an outward sign that each Christian, anointed with the same Holy Spirit, is ‘another Christ’ for the same task, of bringing the good news to the materially and spiritually poor. Christ gave us this mission; and continues to do so, pouring out his Spirit upon the disciples: the same Spirit who fixed upon him, and remained in him during all his earthly life, giving him the strength ‘to proclaim release to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed’ and ‘to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord’ (Lk 4:18-19).’ Chrism is the sign that the same thing happens in us. That’s what makes this celebration a sign of Pentecostal mission in mid-Holy Week, a sign, to adapt Irenaeus’s language, of the Father who gives; the Son who is gifted one; and the Holy Spirit who is himself the gift. Christ’s mission is our mission, his witness our witness, his cost our cost, so that more and more people may be gathered into that Body, and may receive that Gift.

 

 

And at this point—picking up on the fact that in recent times this has become the occasion at which priestly promises are renewed to the bishop, and before the people - I want to address a particular word to the clergy who are renewing those promises today. I recently heard a great story: the bishop asks a parish priest, ‘Father, tell me, how big is your church?’  ‘Well bishop, when it’s completely full, it sleeps seven hundred!’ We were not ordained in order that we, or those we serve, should sleep; but live!

 

Let us think for a moment about the Lord’s words: ‘He has anointed me to tellto announce.’ The same Chrism used at baptisms is also used at ordinations, and other occasions related to priestly ministry, as a sign that the Holy Spirit is upon us to share Christ’s mission:  anointed in other words to preach, to announce, to witness. It is the first task of the priest to be an evangelist, to tell the poor the good news and to gather them to Christ who will make them rich.

 

Friends, that same incident in Nazareth didn’t end well: Jesus experienced failure almost as soon as he began. They threw his words back in his face. We will experience the same thing. But we must ‘revive in ourselves the burning conviction of Paul who cried out: ‘Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel’ (Novo millennio ineunte, 40). Few moments in your ministry are as important as your preaching. That’s why as a small Easter gift I’m giving you all, for your prayer and reflection, a copy of the present pope’s advice (from Evangelii gaudium) about the homily as a central aspect of your anointed task.

 

The need is great. The good news is for the poor. The poor are waiting, hungry and thirsty for good news. But ‘How can they believe if they have not heard? and how can people preach unless they are sent?’  But you have been sent.

 

When people have been gathered to the church, their journey to Christ continues. On their journey towards him we have the astonishing responsibility—for which we’re anointed, not just licensed!—to prepare them by our preaching for their union with Christ, first in the eucharist, and then in mission in the world. Jesus says to us, ‘He who hears you, hears me.’ With biblical and spiritual illiteracy at an all-time high we must toil to preach and to teach. The Kingdom of God is spread by word of mouth, and acts of love; when it’s convenient and when it’s not, on our feet, on our knees, in the pulpit, in the confessional, and in the street. I hope we can learn from Pope Francis’s words and read them alongside that great handbook of evangelism, Matthew chapter 10: ‘What I say to you in the dark, tell in the light; and what you hear whispered, proclaim from the housetops!’

 

To meet present needs—both the needs of the people of God, and the needs of those who are far from the Church—we will have to be immersed in the Word of God, immersed in the Church’s tradition and wisdom, immersed in the Spirit, and work hard at preaching and making God known so that more and more people may be anointed with this Chrism as a sign of God’s indwelling Spirit.

 

That’s the fundamental aspect of this Chrism Eucharist: Pentecost in mid-Holy Week. We consecrate today a sign—a sign for all of us—of our immersion in the Anointed One: being where he is, being who he is, doing what he does, standing in mid-stream of his relationship with the Father, and with the world he so greatly loved, to whom be glory, now and in all eternity.

 

In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.


Bishop of Ebbsfleet's 2016 Chrism Homily



 

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