Station 13: Jesus is deposed from the Cross

Posted on the 10th April 2020 in the category Resources


 

Read the Scripture

 

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.

Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

 

from the Gospel according to St Matthew 27.57-58

When it was evening, there came a rich man from Arimathea, named Joseph, who was also a disciple of Jesus. He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus; then Pilate ordered it to be given to him.

 

from the Gospel according to St Mark 15.42-43, 46

When evening had come, and since it was the day of preparation, that is the day before the Sabbath, Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Joseph bought a linen cloth, and taking down the body, wrapped it in the linen cloth, and laid it in a tomb that had been hewn out of the rock. He then rolled a stone against the door of the tomb.

 

from the Gospel according to St Luke 23.50-52

Now there was a good and righteous man named Joseph, who, though a member of the council, had not agreed to their plan and action. He came from the Jewish town of Arimathea, and he was waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God. This man went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus.

 

from the Gospel according to St John 19.38-39

After these things, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus, though a secret one because of his fear of the Jews, asked Pilate to let him take away the body of Jesus. Pilate gave him permission; so he came and removed his body. Nicodemus, who had at first come to Jesus by night, also came, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, weighing about a hundred pounds.

 

Thanks be to God.

 

Meditate on the Scripture

 

As Jesus is lowered from his cross to the earth, we can see clearly that his passion and death teach us not only to be aware of those who have no protection, who shoulder unbearable burdens, and who suffer unto death, so that we may help them; but they also enable us to escape of the logic of violence that perpetuates itself in the human heart and in human history. Any gesture of reconciliation, forgiveness and prayer like that of Christ dying, which the martyrs and saints in every age (including ours) have shown, is good news that helps us believe that the mystery of Good Friday evening is eternally joined to the dawn of Easter day, and that Christ does not look today for other hands than ours to take care of our brothers and sisters.

 

Pray to the Lord

 

We lift our prayer with confidence to Christ, in whom all things were made.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy … [Kyrie eleison. Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, teach us to forgive as you have forgiven us: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, who you gave yourself as a ransom for the life of the world Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, who have been pierced for our sins: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Contemplate …

 

This is the time when Christ visits the soul.

 

Store up the Lord’s word to you

 

Father of infinite tenderness, you never tire of feeding your sons and daughters by your hand:  help us to look upon your Son who was pierced for our sins, and come to an ever deeper knowledge of his love for us; through the same Christ our Lord.  

 

 

O holy Mary pray for us:  that the wounds your Son endured, which pierced your soul also,

may be imprinted in our hearts, and revealed in lives of mercy and peace.

 


Station 13 - Jesus is deposed from the cross


Station 14: Jesus is brought to the sepulchre

Posted on the 10th April 2020 in the category Resources


 

Read the Scripture

 

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.

Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

 

from the Gospel according to St Matthew 27.59-61

So Joseph took the body and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock. He then rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb and went away. Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were there, sitting opposite the tomb.

 

from the Gospel according to St Mark 15.46-47

Then Joseph bought a linen cloth, and taking down the body, wrapped it in the linen cloth, and laid it in a tomb that had been hewn out of the rock. He then rolled a stone against the door of the tomb. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where the body was laid.

 

from the Gospel according to St Luke 23.52-53

This man went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then he took it down, wrapped it in a linen cloth, and laid it in a rock-hewn tomb where no one had ever been laid.

 

from the Gospel according to St John 19.40-42

They took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews. Now there was a garden in the place where he was crucified, and in the garden there was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid. And so, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and the tomb was nearby, they laid Jesus there.

 

Thanks be to God.

 

Meditate on the Scripture

 

The resurrection will reveal the mysterious and overflowing vitality that stands hidden in plain sight in the cross of Christ. But all that vitality is possible because this is the cross of Christ and not just one of the many thousands of crucifixions that took place in Roman Palestine. Christ is the one who transforms it. And the baptized and anointed Christian, the disciple of Christ, receives from his master and Lord the same task: namely, to transform the cross of man into the cross of Christ. The cross of man is ambiguous, it is hopeless, it suffocates and kills life. The cross of Christ is luminous, it has the name of love, and as an unquenchable act of hope it prepares the victory of life and the resurrection.

 

Pray to the Lord

 

Lord Jesus, the only mediator between God and man, listen to our trusting prayer.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy … [Kyrie eleison. Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, who made yourself as lowly as your brothers and sisters: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, who alone love mankind: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, our high priest, powerful and faithful: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Contemplate …

 

This is the time when Christ visits the soul.

 

Store up the Lord’s word to you

 

O God, creator and maker of life, help us to enter more deeply into the mystery of him who like a buried grain of wheat entered into the darkness of death, and rose again by your mighty power, to grow in our hearts a hundred fold; through the same Christ our Lord.  

 

 

O holy Mary pray for us:  that the wounds your Son endured, which pierced your soul also,

may be imprinted in our hearts, and revealed in lives of mercy and peace.

 


Station 14: Jesus is brought to the Sepulchre


Station 15: Jesus rises from the dead

Posted on the 10th April 2020 in the category Resources


 

Read the Scripture

 

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.

Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

 

from the Gospel according to St Mark 16.6-8

But the angel said to them, ‘Do not be alarmed; you are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has been raised; he is not here. Look, there is the place they laid him. But go, tell his disciples and Peter that he is going ahead of you to Galilee; there you will see him, just as he told you.’ So they went out and fled from the tomb, for terror and amazement had seized them; and they said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.

 

Thanks be to God.

 

Meditate on the Scripture

 

Easter does not immediately remove the realities of human life and suffering, but tells us that since Christ is alive in the glory of God, alive in the Church and in history, and as a result of the Church’s testimony alive also in us, it is possible for us to love and hope and believe more and more. Christ assures us that those who live in love, even through the midst suffering and death, are not abandoned by God, but are welcomed, loved, and drawn nearer to the fullness of peace and joy. Those who love receive Christ’s Spirit and are made capable of transmitting life to others around themselves. Through this Easter joy, a joy rooted in the cross of Christ, we shall find ways to announce true hope to our brothers and sisters. ‘This is the victory that has overcome the world—our faith.’ (1 Jn 5.4) 

 

Pray to the Lord

 

We raise our prayers to the only Lord Jesus, who died on the cross and now lives at the Father’s right hand.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy … [Kyrie eleison. Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, you have opened for us the way to eternal life: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, you have risen to life to for our justification: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Lord Jesus, you share with us the love that overcomes death: Lord, have mercy. … [Kyrie eleison. …]

 

Contemplate …

 

This is the time when Christ visits the soul.

 

Store up the Lord’s word to you

 

O Father, who through your only Son have overcome death and opened for us the gate of life eternal:  grant us to be daily born again in the light and life and love of your risen Son; through the same Christ our Lord.  

 

 

O holy Mary pray for us:  that the wounds your Son endured, which pierced your soul also,

may be imprinted in our hearts, and revealed in lives of mercy and peace.

 

 

 

A Final Prayer

 

Almighty God, it is you who made the heavens and the earth by your great power, and by your outstretched arm. Nothing is beyond your power.  We turn to you in our need, to ask your protection against coronavirus, which has claimed lives and affected many.  We pray for those afflicted.  May they soon be restored to health.  Grant this through Christ our Lord. Amen.


Station 15 - Jesus rises from the dead


Maundy Thursday: Mass of the Lord's Supper

Posted on the 9th April 2020 in the category Resources


Gospel: John 13.1-17, 31-35

 

Now before the festival of the Passover, Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart from this world and go to the Father. Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end. The devil had already put it into the heart of Judas son of Simon Iscariot to betray him.

 

And during supper Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, got up from the table, took off his outer robe, and tied a towel around himself. Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was tied around him. He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, ‘Lord, are you going to wash my feet?’ Jesus answered, ‘You do not know now what I am doing, but later you will understand.’ Peter said to him, ‘You will never wash my feet.’ Jesus answered, ‘Unless I wash you, you have no share with me.’ Simon Peter said to him, ‘Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!’ Jesus said to him, ‘One who has bathed does not need to wash, except for the feet, but is entirely clean. And you are clean, though not all of you.’ For he knew who was to betray him; for this reason he said, ‘Not all of you are clean.’ After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, ‘Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord—and you are right, for that is what I am. So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you. Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them. If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them.

 

When Judas son of Simon Iscariot had gone out, Jesus said, ‘Now the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified in him. If God has been glorified in him, God will also glorify him in himself and will glorify him at once. Little children, I am with you only a little longer. You will look for me; and as I said to the Jews so now I say to you, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come.’ I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.’

 

Homily

 

Tonight the doors of all churches are firmly closed – for the time being at least, to help prevent a lethal infection from spreading among us. But the sacred three days of the Church, like the Jewish Passover to which they are linked, simply cannot be rescheduled or cancelled, any more than you can reschedule or cancel the moon! Thus, like the slow opening wide of the massive western doors of some great cathedral, tonight’s celebration of the Eucharist will once again begin the Church’s annual commemoration of a sequence of events which transformed the world.

 

Moreover, tonight’s Eucharist begins but doesn’t finish. Like the unique Supper in the Upper Room that it commemorates, it ‘dissolves’ as Jesus with his disciples slips away through the city wall on his night passage across the valley to Gethsemene. Events become unstoppable: the betrayal, the arrest, the imprisonment, the trial, the condemnation, the via crucis, the crucifixion, the deposition and entombment, and the rising again to what the Orthodox call the ‘Day without evening’. So it may be more accurate to say tonight’s Eucharist starts but can never finish.

 

Famously St John introduces this moment in his gospel (13.1) when he says, ‘It was just before Passover, and Jesus – knowing that his hour had come to depart from the world, and having loved his own who were in the world – loved them to the utter limit.’ He recognized the moment that he had long tried to teach the disciples about, and accepted it. ‘When the time came for him to be glorified by you, his heavenly Father, he showed the depth of his love.’

 

The first fruit of Jesus’s recognition and acceptance is the first Eucharist. While he still had his freedom, he handed himself over into his disciples hands, in the sacrament that would embody him not just for the meanwhile, but on countless of occasions since. ‘Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?’, he’d once asked them. Well, ‘Do this, as often as you drink it, in memory of me’.

 

We see the same movement of Jesus’s spirit in his prayer in Gethsemene. ‘Not what I will but what you Father will’ (Mk 14:36c). Jesus found his complete fulfilment in being total abandoned to the Father. His human will clung to the divine will, and he restored to human beings the possibility of an unreserved ‘yes’ to God.

 

2

 

Why might all this be so important? How might this answer or console the fear, and suffering, and grief, with which we are surrounded, and which indeed invades our hearts too. Or how, for that matter might it support the courage, generosity and compassion that so many are showing in their self-less work outside their homes?

 

Faced with such a question I would point to the fact that the death of Jesus is quite unlike death as human beings normally face it. Human lives are normally we say ‘lost’, ‘taken away’ by age, sickness, violence and war. In some cases – the bravery of soldiers, for example; or the selflessness of medics and carers such as we are seeing in every land today – life is risked and spent in the course of service or duty. But Jesus, having freely accepted his death, gave himself away for love of us, to heal and reconcile us. It’s what is meant by the familiar words ‘Before he was given up to death, a death he willingly accepted, he took bread, gave it to his disciples, and said ‘This is my body, which will be given up for you.’

 

Therefore this death, unlike any other human death, is redemptive, and gives us reason to hope in God’s grace and mercy towards us: hope that in all circumstances our lives and our deaths, and the lives and deaths of our loves ones, can be identified with his, who identified his life and his death with us.

 

3

 

We do all already know this. Whenever we pray ‘Our Father, who art in heaven’, we ask ‘thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven’ (Mt 6:10). Whenever we pray those very familiar words we recognize that there is a will of God for human lives, a will that we must try to accept as the basis of our own wills, and words, and actions. And we are given the assurance that wherever on earth that will is done, becomes ‘as it is in heaven’, where love, goodness, truth and beauty are present, and ‘death and crying and pain will be no more’ (Rev 21.4).

 

 

Prayer

 

FATHER, I raise to thee my whole being, a vessel emptied of self.  Accept Lord, this emptiness, and so fill me with thyself, thy Light, thy Life, thy Love, that these thy precious gifts may over-flow the chalice of my heart into the hearts of anyone I meet, revealing unto them the beauty of thy joy and wholeness, and the serenity of thy peace which nothing can destroy.  Amen.


Maundy Thursday homily


Renewal of Vows

Posted on the 7th April 2020 in the category Announcements


The Bishop of Ebbsfleet will live-stream an Act of Prayer for the Renewal of Ordination Promises before the Blessed Sacrament for the clergy under his oversight at 11.30 on Maundy Thursday morning via his Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/bishopofebbsfleet


  



 

First

Previous

Next

Last

Records 41 to 45 of 49